Copyright  © The Beautiful Pig
GOOD MOLD VS. BAD MOLD White powdery mold of Italian salumeria fame is added for appearance by some salami producers and is harmless.  However, improper storage of your salami can result in undesirable molds.  To remove and discourage any unwanted molds, wipe the area with a paper towel soaked in salty water or vinegar, then peel and enjoy your salami.   SO WHAT ABOUT NITRATES AND NITRATES? For centuries, traditional curing salts have all contained a combination of nitrites and nitrates to preserve flavor, color, quality and protect against bacteria.  All products labeled no nitrates or nitrites list celery juice in their ingredient lists.   The USDA does not classify celery juice concentrate as a curing agent, but as a flavoring.  Celery juice concentrate contain nitrates, which convert to nitrites during digestion—this is a natural process; you cannot survive without these compounds in your body.  Only ground product (salami) require one or the other to protect from botulism.  Beautiful Pig whole muscle meat products contain none at all.  
STORAGE Your salami is a shelf stable product and does not require refrigeration. It is best stored in a dark place or on the counter loosely wrapped. Fine salami needs to breathe.   PEELING Wrap your salami in damp paper towels for ten minutes (longer if the casing is hard) then with a sharp knife, score and peel the portion you wish to use. SERVING All dry cured products such as salami and prosciutto should be sliced extremely thin and served at room temperature to release the maximum flavor.  An electric slicer does it best of course, but otherwise invest in a sharp knife.  Charcuterie loves acidity. Pair with good olives and cornichons, fresh lemon juice, great cheeses and beautiful dry wines.  
Storing and serving charcuterie
Copyright  © The Beautiful Pig
GOOD MOLD VS. BAD MOLD White powdery mold of Italian salumeria fame is added for appearance by some salami producers and is harmless.  However, improper storage of your salami can result in undesirable molds.  To remove and discourage any unwanted molds, wipe the area with a paper towel soaked in salty water or vinegar, then peel and enjoy your salami.   SO WHAT ABOUT NITRATES AND NITRATES? For centuries, traditional curing salts have all contained a combination of nitrites and nitrates to preserve flavor, color, quality and protect against bacteria.  All products labeled no nitrates or nitrites list celery juice in their ingredient lists.   The USDA does not classify celery juice concentrate as a curing agent, but as a flavoring.  Celery juice concentrate contain nitrates, which convert to nitrites during digestion—this is a natural process; you cannot survive without these compounds in your body.  Only ground product (salami) require one or the other to protect from botulism.  Beautiful Pig whole muscle meat products contain none at all.  
STORAGE Your salami is a shelf stable product and does not require refrigeration. It is best stored in a dark place or on the counter loosely wrapped. Fine salami needs to breathe.   PEELING Wrap your salami in damp paper towels for ten minutes (longer if the casing is hard) then with a sharp knife, score and peel the portion you wish to use. SERVING All dry cured products such as salami and prosciutto should be sliced extremely thin and served at room temperature to release the maximum flavor.  An electric slicer does it best of course, but otherwise invest in a sharp knife.  Charcuterie loves acidity. Pair with good olives and cornichons, fresh lemon juice, great cheeses and beautiful dry wines.  
Storing and serving charcuterie
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